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Our regular update on what's happening in the World of Bulldog Rescue

This Blog is Tania's own personal opinion and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the charity


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A week in Rescue: 18 August 2019

Summer is over half way through and apart from a few real hot days, the rest has been a bit of a wash out. We are only 19 days away from the Picnic and we are hoping beyond hope that the weather makes up it's mind soon - somewhere in between would be perfect so if any one knows the Bulldog Friendly weather dance - feel free to perform it as many times as you like.

We are a couple of weeks into our new listing system, I was sent some iFrame code to split the dogs back into areasG but I'll be honest - it don't work - well not for me anyway. I will keep working on it but meanwhile keeping on top of the never ending list of dogs that need going on the web site is so much quicker AND it happens in real time as each dog's file is attached to the web listing. We've had to tweak a few bits over the last few weeks but hopefully it is proving to be user friendly. If you have any suggestions or critisms please do not hesitate to let us know, we can only guess from this side if any of it isn't working.

Keep your fingers crossed for me next week, Carrie is having a very well deserved week off and little ole me will be doing both jobs. Thankfully there are just the 3 girls here at the moment so it's shouldn't be too difficult as we managed to get the dear (not so) little Stan to his new home yesterday. A 7 hour round trip to Margate was so worth it for his perfect new mum - wish him luck - not that he will need it. His new mummy has had dogs from rescue longer than I've had a front door key and Stan will be a great addition to her photo collection of dogs that go right back to the 70s.

It still never easy walking away though, no matter how much you know it's the best thing

Good luck Stan the Man, it was an absolute pleasure knowing you xxx

So if I'm still alive in a weeks time - see you next weeks

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A week in Rescue: 11 August 2019

No blog last week as I was on my holibobs - well I say holibobs, it was my annual week off, the one and only week apart from Christmas week that I take off. Well I say take off - I'm around and I dip in and out just to be sure I don't come back to a hugmungous back log but it's enough for me as I hate time off and I'll be honest I can't wait for tomorrow morning when I can get back to normal.

I started the week with my quarterly trip to the Midlands for the Breed Council meeting. I've always felt it important that rescue is represented at Breed Council level and we've worked hard to try and make sure we work together on areas of Health and Education within the breed. One of the areas we've always felt we can help them with is the education of pet owners and the meeting concluded with an invitation for me to join the Education Committee. I am very excited about this as I feel there are lots of areas we can work together on. I also really love the drive up, it's 3 hours of just me and the feeling of whack up the music and point the van in the general direction of the M40 is a good feeling - plus I get to treat myself to a whole tray of Krispy Kreme donuts on the drive back again.

The rest of the week was quite relaxing. I allowed myself 2 hours a day to work so the day to day stuff didn't get neglected and the rest of the time was mostly spent with 2 of my grandchildren. We took part in a local radio station Beach Clean up which we all thoroughly enjoyed. It was a bit windy but we managed to fill almost 2 sacks of rubbish from Bognor Beach, followed by a free icec ream from Pinks (the lovely lady that supplies the ice cream van at the picnic) which to be fair was my grand son's favourite bit LOL

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Sadly, the week ended on a very sad note as we had to call time on poor little Evie on Friday. We allowed her the dignity of a home visit and she left us very peacefully. I honestly feel she was ready to leave us and to help me work through the whole thing I put all the FaceBook clips together to show the time line of her journey with us. It's so sad to watch as you can see her gradual decline with each clip but if you are up to it, please take a moment to remember one of the bravest bulldogs we've ever met. Rest In Peace Evie, we so wanted to help you and I'm so sorry we didn't make that happen in the way we all wanted.

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A Week in Rescue: 28 July 2019

An interesting week in what was yet another scorching hot few days, so hot in fact that the dogs here didn't get their usual walk which I must admit didn't go down very well but we have to be sensible when the heat reaches 30 degrees. Thank fully by Friday it was cooler and come Saturday Carrie and Star were walking the dogs in the rain. Star is my 7 year old grand daughter and for as long as she could walk has been a regular helper in the kennel. Not even the rain put her off and the dogs adore her.

A new arrival on Friday called Stanley is settling in well, he's a bit of a houdini by all accounts but for now we will concentrate on getting his sore feet under control and then hopefully he will be ready to rehome very soon.

Evie went back to the vet on Wednesday, we are now thinking her jaw actually dislocates. That would explain why some days she's in pain and some days she isn't and also why she won't open her mouth too wide as she's probably worked out that will dislocate it. She going in first thing in the morning for further xrays and an anesthetic so we can see exactly what's going on and open the mouth wide enough to see without hurting her.  Watch this space, we'll bring you up to date next week with what we find.

Those on our waiting list may have noticed things have changed slightly on our web site over this weekend. Our "To List" list has become impossible to keep up with so we have changed the way dogs are listed. Applications and Interests will continue to be done in exactly the same way but over the course of the next week you will notice that there will be a massive flurry of new dogs. As the week progresses you should also hopefully notice a few tweaks to the way you can search for dogs so please bear with us whilst we switch between the two systems, but it will be so worth it I promise.

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A week in Rescue: 21 July 2019

A quick hop, skip and a jump over to our friends at CRUFFA makes interesting reading this week. I'm not actually sure if the woman is genuine in her mission to educate or if she is now so obsessed that the blinkers are now right over both eyes. Some of her posts border on slander and I really don't know how she's got away with so much. But there was one post that I did find interesting though:

No photo description available.

I'm not going to comment, I think people can make up their own conclusion from these figures - especially the NRC section which I think speaks for itself. She's definately on a mission though and is even holding her own BOAS testing in an effort to bring together every unhealthy bulldog in the universe to prove that all bulldogs, pugs and a miriade of brachycaphalic breeds should all be killed.

Evie is finally back at the vets this week now that her vet is back from her holibobs, we will let you know what happens as the weakness in that side of her face has now also reached her eye. There's definately something sinister going on here - I just wish we could get to the bottom of it. Again, thank you to everyone that is helping us get there, the support you have shown for this little lady is just amazing.

We said goodbye to Winston from the kennels this week. Such a fantastic laid back little man and boy was he popular, 44 families were considered from 67 applications but his lucky new owner was perfect for him and we wish him all the luck in the world in his new life - her certainly looks happy about it all and his replacement is already lined up ready to land.

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Something that did upset me this week, going through the outstanding adoption fees the total came to £5800.00 - that's a months vet bill!! Reminders all sent which is time away from something more useful but it saddens me that when people finally get chosen for a dog they think it's OK to not actually pay for it. I do wonder how people think we survive from day to day without any funding.

So until next week - remember it's going to be a hot one!!!

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A week in Rescue: 14 July 2019

Another exhaustingly hot week and not much fun for our residents, but they had a lovely new person in their lives this week as we welcomed another Work Experience girl from the local college. Elise hopes to become a vet so what better way to spend your week then snogging bulldogs. She's learned a lot about a breed that, once in Vet School, will be totally contradicted as she is told that they are all genetic disasters and should be culled. With her help we finally managed to get a good video of Eve's jaw issues. The £200 blood test has ruled out MMA and there was nothing remarkable on her xrays so the plan is (once her vet comes back from her holidays) is to redo these xrays. This is what she does - although not every time which is strange in itself.

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https://youtu.be/VWMqi-6JdWA

She sure is another BDR mystery case. Pain killers have no or little effect and it's not something she does every time she eats. We will continue to keep you posted

Winston will be leaving us in the week as his new mummy passed her home check yesterday but his place is already filled as the dogs queue up for the spaces. It's sad that not everyone is prepared to wait and would rather stick their dog on Facebook rather than wait for professional and experienced help - but as they say - nowt as quere as folk!

 

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A week in Rescue: 7 July 2019

Well, the cramming weekend paid off - although it was touch and go there for a second. I really must learn to spread the CPD out more evenly but I am able to continue as an Animal Health Advisor for a further 2 years and managed to accumulate more points that needed:

  • Active CPD Period: 5
  • Total CPD points: 56
  • CPD points target: 30
  • CPD target met: Yes

Having the clinic is a really handy part of the Rescue's set up, not just the flea and worm treatment for internal use - but there are plenty of items at hardly any mark up for bulldog owners across the UK. Check it out at The Bulldog Clinic if you want to know a bit more but in the meantime my qualification is safe - for now at least.

Can you beleive we've cleared half of 2019 already? Who remembers when the year 2020 was really really really in the future. We are meant to be travelling around on mono rails, eating hydrated food but something we are still batting with is the continued rise in dog's needing new homes. June saw 21 new requests for rehoming and although that's 7 less than the same period last year I'm not sure we can see that as a good thing because the dogs coming in now stay longer and cost more before rehoming but as we've said so many times before - the Breed Rescue's remain the safest way of rehoming. We were disappointed earlier this week when a dog who's owner we had been working with suddendly disappeared. It later transpired another rescue had "removed" it from the garden and then passed it on to another rescue. I spoke to the rescue involved and asked them why they didn't hand the dog to us, bearing in mind we had been working with the owner (who has cancer) gaining trust and securing the dog through the proper channels. The response is one that we hear all the time - we don't trust rescues that support breeding. We've always tried very hard to work with good breeders and make huge efforts to educate the public as to where to go to buy a pup. It's quite frustrating to hear that after all these years breeders are still seen as the problem when in fact working with the right breeders could be the solution - besides no breeders no dog!!!

Thank you to everyone that has contacted us regarding our own dog Stan who went blind last weekend. He's been on intestive treatment this week involving 2 types of eye drops 5-6 times a day - difficult for a dog who thinks even flea treatment is Novichok, but there's definately some improvement - although it is hard to tell if your dog can see when he spends 23 hours a day with his eyes shut. We are not entirely sure what happened, the vet feels it's connected to dry eye but Stan has never suffered with dry eye and to be fair it's a condition we would recognise but whatever the cause getting even a little sight back is definately a step in the right direction. Lets hope it continues

A recent Kennel club workshop published a very interesting report which includes future suggestions for the registration of CNR dogs of various breeds.

I've copied below the extract of the report that covers CNR but you can also view the whole report here

 

Did you see our intreprid ghost hunters this weekend? They spent 6 hours in Draklow Tunnels and apart from managing to scare themselves stupid, they also managed to raise just over £800 in the process

You can see some photos from the night here:https://www.facebook.com/events/2313082468947278

And there's still time to donate here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Georgia-Burton2

So until next week, thanks for dropping by but before you go please take a moment to nominate us as Charity of the Year which you can do here: https://www.justgiving.com/awards/2019/coty

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Please note Tania's opinions do not necessarily reflect the opinons of Bulldog Rescue

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"Charlotte MacNamara led the group on the registration on non-standard colours
(CNR) and reported that the KC will be holding consultation meetings with affected breeds.
The issue covers all breeds, not just blue French Bulldogs. Any policy decision in relation to
CNR could well impact on every breed. She asked that people should consider the facts and
evidence, and pointed out that a lot of our beliefs are not shaped by the evidence.
The group summarised it discussions under 5 headings: Registrations, Breed Standards,
Health, Education and Breeding.
Registrations:
Nobody thought that having CNR as a registration choice was a good idea; dogs should be
registered as the correct colour and these should be stated on their KC pedigree. This then,
of course, led to a discussion on what colours should be offered in the registration lists and
that there may need to be some form of colour palette available to help breeders choose the
correct colour for their puppies. The fact that, in some breeds, a puppy’s colour can change
as it grows up, adds to the difficulty of getting it right when they are very young.
In some breeds it is known that CNR dogs are a result of importation of crossbreeds and
there is some pressure to remove these from the registration database completely (Blue
Weimaraners was the specific example). Having proof of “crossbreeds” is, in many cases,
problematic. In many breeds, however, CNR colours have occurred naturally, albeit maybe
only in very low numbers, for many years. The KC has asked geneticists around the world,
but none are able to be definitive about colours that don’t “occur naturally” in a breed. In
some cases, standard and CNR puppies are born in the same litter and it would not be
sensible to have a blanket removal of CNR from the register. There is the additional
complication of imports and exports; reciprocal agreements with other KCs may need to be
reviewed because an acceptable colour outside the UK may not be acceptable here.
It was also agreed that DNA profiling was an essential tool to help protect the integrity of the
registration system.
Breed Standards:
We were reminded that a Breed Standard describes an ideal profile of a breed and that there
may well be a difference between colours that exist in a breed and those that are desirable
in the showring. The 2 issues should be kept separate so that a BS should explain the
desirable colours and “all other colours are highly undesirable”. A few breeds reported that
their BS Colour Clauses needed tidying-up and noted that a KC process exists to do this.
The view was also expressed that the showring (via judges) is the best place to deal with
undesirable colours.
Health:
The evidence on any health differences between CNR and standard colour puppies is, in
many cases, not available (although some reports have recently been published on Pugs
and Bulldogs). If health testing was mandatory, or breeders were required to participate in
Breed Club health schemes, that could help matters. It was agreed that more research is
required to identify where and if there are any health risks associated with particular colours.
Education:
The whole terminology of colours and patterns is full of complexity and ambiguity. Different
breeds use different terms for the same colours/patterns. Phrases like “non-standard” and
“not naturally occurring” don’t necessarily help, particularly when it comes to novice breeders
registering their puppies. It was felt that, for many breeders who only ever register 1 litter,
the choice of colour was fraught with difficulty. These people may not actually be fraudulently
selecting colours; they may simply not know what is correct. (The colour palette option
mentioned above could help.) The KC and Breed Clubs need to do more to help improve
breeders’ knowledge of what is correct, for registration.
Breeding:
It is evident that there is a problem with high-volume stud dogs and high-volume breeders of
CNR puppies. The demand for “rare” colours is driving this undesirable breeding behaviour
and it was felt that the KC should be more proactive in investigating this category of breeder.
Perhaps there should be criteria for limiting Popular Sires and imposing health testing
requirements on them for registration of their offspring. It was also thought that some of the
high-volume breeders are selling puppies with mandatory breeding contracts and this may
be the source of the large pool of 1-off litters from novice breeders. There might be a
pyramid effect, filtering down from a small number of high-volume breeders, perhaps as a
way of getting around the current licensing regulations."

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A week in Rescue: 30 June 2019

I don't know about you, but I can't bear this weather, the next person that says "isn't this weather lovely" - I swear I will not be responsible for my actions. It's too hot for the dogs and it's too hot for me, it makes me irritable and grumpy and it's next to impossible to concentrate on anything! I know we don't see much hot weather in this country but to be fair - that's why I've never thought about going to Spain or Australia, I like the British weather - unless of course it's too cold but that's a whole different rant.

Please remember though that it is too hot to walk your dog

Seriously, please don't risk it

Our recent visit to our vets with Evie found a booklet on the counter which I know has already caused a few ruffled feathers. "A Guide to Brachycephalic Breeds" published by My Family Pet appears to have sprung up in vets waiting rooms across the country. Bizarre in itself as a quick look at the web site shows they are in fact an On Line Vet company so are in effect out to pinch their customers - but the 25 page booklet has a very worrying conclusion